Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

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Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Ford » Sat Nov 26, 2011 3:12 pm

I came across these short films and thought they'd be of interest here. This is a goldsmith called Paolo Penko in Florence (Firenze)

I know Karl will appreciate them and Matthias will enjoy the coin striking I'm sure :biggrin:

This is cuttlefish casting and niello fusion inlay.





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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Karl Wunderlich » Sat Nov 26, 2011 3:59 pm

Thanks for those videos, Ford. :sunny:
These crazy Italians... I assume in the next videos he might ignite a jet engine to melt down some grams of gold. :biggrin:
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Ford » Sat Nov 26, 2011 4:27 pm

Yes, I also though the "exaggerated" flames was amusing. Possibly just for dramatic effect for the film ;) I'd never stoop to using such pyrotechnic special effects :rolleyes: :smartass:
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Kevin » Sat Nov 26, 2011 4:52 pm

As if you'd think the heated crucibles shot in the dark are dramatic enough... ;)

Thanks for posting these - the cuttlebone casting clips are well-timed, as I'm planning on giving this a try in the next week. :D
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Dick Bonham » Sat Nov 26, 2011 5:28 pm

Thanks for the videos Ford. I love how they work in a pressed shirt and tie with no apron. I would last about 30 seconds before destroying those clothes.
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Ford » Sat Nov 26, 2011 9:54 pm

Hi Dick

I remember well as an apprentice one of the badges of of honour/belonging were lots of small holes in one's jeans at the top. This was a result of quenching hot metal in pickle. Tiny droplets of acid were thrown onto or clothing and the damage only became visible after the next wash. None of the qualified goldsmiths bore this "badge"...yet we appies bore our "scars" with pride. :cloud9:

Nowadays it a matter of pride not to get filthy when doing one's work so the pressed shirt and tie is quite apropos. :clap:
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Sage » Sat Nov 26, 2011 10:44 pm

Ford wrote:
Nowadays it a matter of pride not to get filthy when doing one's work so the pressed shirt and tie is quite apropos. :clap:


I shan't share pics of my work clothes then... :doh: :uhoh:

At my last job we'd occasionally have "Suit Day" for fun. I quite enjoyed doing site visits and installs in my pinstripe silk vest and red tie. Of course, after burning a 2" diameter hole in the tie it got re-purposed as a flag for over-length loads in the truck ;)
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Eldon » Sun Nov 27, 2011 1:16 am

Absolutely amazing and wonderful to see these old world techniques such as the scuttle fish casting! I also love the great fire show and am with Karl about the Jet engine :scream: :scream:
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Doug Sanders » Mon Nov 28, 2011 5:47 pm

I need to start work on my orchestral theme now. Soaring strings reaching a crescendo as I take off my optivisor and pick up my used toothbrush to dust away some shavings.
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Julio » Mon Nov 28, 2011 7:05 pm

Doug Sanders wrote:I need to start work on my orchestral theme now. Soaring strings reaching a crescendo as I take off my optivisor and pick up my used toothbrush to dust away some shavings.


Well, if barbers in Seville can have their own orchestral works, why can't a netsukeshi in Indiana have his own? ;)
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Matthias B » Mon Nov 28, 2011 8:20 pm

It was a bit of a fight to see the first video because of the music. I also make my blanks often this way, but this is certainly not how a Fiorino was made. In any case he has nice tools!

The flames are certainly for effect. I wrote last year an article for a magazine about making an Merovingian coin. Glowing molten metal and flames just make good photos, unlike a chisel or a hammer.

There is also a dop stick shown. Does someone know how it is called in German? I bought it a few weeks ago on ebay together with some punches, a hammer, a sand pillow ring and a 16.5kg engravers ball.

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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Ford » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:09 pm

There is also a dop stick shown. Does someone know how it is called in German?


I'm sure Herr Wunderkind will know ;)
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Karl Wunderlich » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:26 pm

Matthias B wrote:....There is also a dop stick shown. Does someone know how it is called in German? ....Matthias

Its called "Kittstock". There is quite a number of different shapes for different purposes.
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Matthias B » Mon Nov 28, 2011 9:48 pm

Thanks!
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Re: Some old-school European Goldsmithing technique

Postby Tim F » Sun Nov 20, 2016 12:04 am

Ha! This was actually quite helpful for me! I know it's been a while since someone commented here. I started here just interested in japanese metal work, made a ring out of shibuichi for myself as a fun project. A guy bought it off my finger for R750! A week later I lost my job. I had most of the equipment so I decided I'd make pendants and sell to pass the time. This was 5 months ago.

Today I sit busy with an apprenticeship with a master goldsmith, and I'm making jewelery.

Back to the video, a client wanted a signet ring, solid not hollow like you see all over the show, I've made both and IMO the solid ones are far nicer. Any way, this video I watched 5 times and stole as much as I could with my eyes. I made a signet in sterling exactly like it for a client. Will post pictures soon, can't post from my phone for some reason.

Thanks Ford, you've given my life purpose again, and a new found love that keeps me off the street and fed. I will forever be grateful.
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