question as traditional Japanese names

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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Natasha » Wed Apr 02, 2008 5:52 pm

Thank You very much, Ataru!
I was so astonished by my name in Japanese! :hehe: My name came from old Scandinavia and meant "Nature, native".
I think it can be very interesting game in Japane, to write foreign names using KANJI and than to read what they mean! :rolleyes:
Thank You very much for your help!
Today I've renewed my site and added your link! How is spring in your country? In Moldova it's raining a lot, but there are many blossoming cherry and wild plum trees! It is so wonderful to see them through the wall of rain! Under trees there are many fallen white petals, like a snow! The whole city looks like among clouds! I hope the next week will be sunny! Spring mood to You all, Friends! :cloud9:
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Ataru Maeda » Wed Apr 02, 2008 6:04 pm

thank you Ford, :biggrin:
Rock'n'roll? great! :hehe: for me, native speaker's English is as a Progressive rock...sometimes, I cannot understand... :happy:
Inside my acquaintances, there aren't any of those NETSUKE artists or Metal workers who can write or read in English, and, going without saying, we are so shy according to our nationality... :embarassed: even me, I couldn't join in without your help. :redface: It's a bit difficult issue I think... so sorry but expect me when you see me. :happy: I don't know so many of those Metal workers, so, there should be some of those could join in...maybe... :happy:

Regards,
Ataru
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Ataru Maeda » Thu Apr 03, 2008 3:07 pm

Not at all Natasha,
The Russian women's name "Natasha" is very famous one in Japan also, but now, I've noticed of its real meaning indeed !. :biggrin: Thank you for adding my Blog. I'd also willingly added your link into. Also, I saw your works contributed to INS journal. Those were so nice ! I cannot express all my feelings by using English, but those are so elegant and delicate, but, perfectly constructed as a NETSUKE. I wanna see and touch those someday somewhere. :scream:
In Ciba or Tokyo, SAKURA is coming into bloom. I joined to cherry blossom viewing with my friends few days before. Now is the most beautiful season in my country. :cloud9:

Regards,
Ataru
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Doug Sanders » Thu Apr 03, 2008 3:30 pm

Ataru,
I'm a curious student, and wondering why in Natasha's name in hiragana, you've included the single stroke "ichi" between the characters for 'nata' and 'sha' ?

Thanks for the education! :smart:
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Ataru Maeda » Thu Apr 03, 2008 4:15 pm

Ok Doug, :biggrin:
We pronounce the name "Natasha" as "Nataasha" in Japanese. I don't know how to call it in English, the long tone should be written like it. So, it's almost as same character as "ICHI", but not as same as "ICHI" in KANJI that you'd wrote. :dizzy: This character is only for HIRAGANA and KATAKANA. You should never use it in KANJI. :dizzy: So we pronounce your name "Sanders" as "Sandeers" and, in KATAKANA, サンダース. Could you see this font ? :biggrin:
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Doug Sanders » Thu Apr 03, 2008 5:41 pm

Got it! :biggrin: I was aware of holding the vowel longer on some words- the 'o' in 'Edo' right? When these words are written in roman letters, there is a line above the vowel. I think they give it the fancy word 'diacritical mark' in English. I don't recall learning about it for hiragana though. Much appreciated :sunny:
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Natasha » Thu Apr 03, 2008 6:48 pm

Thank You, Ataru!
I've not seen the article in the INS journal yet, it is not arrived here. But I know about it! I'm so waiting this publication! :pray:
Thank You! :redface:
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Ataru Maeda » Fri Apr 04, 2008 7:33 am

Oh, sorry Doug, :pray:
You seems to be an advanced researcher about it. :biggrin: I wrote that we use this character only to HIRAGANA and KATAKANA, but in HIRAGANA, we seldom use it. We use it in HIRAGANA as a slang or so, but, I felt it's cute to be used on females name as well, according to Natasya. :redface:

It's about feelings, but, this is the conclusion that you might spell those terms in KATAKANA those from foreigners(for us), :naughty: and, It'll be a bit cute to write down those in HIRAGANA. :redface: I love those, and we all accept those, but in an official occasion, it'll be the better way to use KATAKANA. :clap: But, we are an artist outside from general public (only me? ;) ), so, I feel it's welcome to use HIRAGANA in your name or so ! it's not a rude manner, and I love it ! :hehe:
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Re: question as traditional Japanese names

Postby Julio » Fri Apr 11, 2008 1:53 pm

Thanks for taking your time to share with us all of this Ataru. I have been meaning to start learning japanese, but I haven't found a grammar book in South America yet, so I will have to wait until I go back to the U.K in the summer and fetch one.

In the mean time is my name completely untranslatable? (if it helps the one I never use that still appears as my given name is Julio Alejandro, all j's pronounced as H, example Hooleeo) :hehe:

I promise not to pester you and study your language instead. :biggrin:
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